Sustainability... In Business

Top 5 moments from EPN’s events: ‘None pooped on stage, either’

Five years ago, David Hanselmann helped launch the Environmental Professionals Network, a statewide professional group based in CFAES’s School of Environment and Natural Resources.

Since then, EPN has grown to have nearly 2,000 members. It’s held 55 public monthly Breakfast Club programs, which typically draw more than 125 people, and five signature events, whose top attendance has been 1,400.

Hanselmann, who coordinates EPN as a lecturer in SENR, shares his top five moments from those events …

April 19: Who will be at the small business, climate change roundtable

The guests at tomorrow’s roundtable discussion on small business and climate change, which is from 5-8 p.m. in CFAES’s Nationwide and Ohio Farm Bureau 4-H Center on Ohio State’s campus in Columbus, will include Ohio Rep. Fred Strahorn; Michael Schadek, assistant director for intergovernmental affairs and economic development for the city of Columbus; and representatives from Ohio Rep. Anne Gonzales’s Columbus office, U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown’s Columbus office, Java Central Cafe and Roaster, car2go Columbus, the Land-Grant Brewing Company, Ohiyo Chocolate, Portia’s Café, Fusian, and Wolf’s Ridge Brewing.

Nonpartisan group Defend Our Future is hosting the event. Details: Marguerite Dooley, marguerite@defendourfuture.org.

April 19: How climate change is affecting small businesses

The nonprofit, nonpartisan climate advocacy group Defend Our Future is hosting a roundtable discussion with Columbus-area small business owners and Columbus and Ohio elected officials on April 19 on Ohio State’s Columbus campus. It’s from 5-8 p.m. in CFAES’s Nationwide and Ohio Farm Bureau 4-H Center, 2201 Fred Taylor Drive.

A media advisory from the group said the discussion “will touch on the impact climate change is having on small businesses, their bottom lines and consumer preferences and how strong state and national environmental protections, such as those provided by the EPA, are important factors for a healthy and vibrant business community.”

Contact Marguerite Dooley, marguerite@defendourfuture.org, for details.

Report: ‘Renewable power will dominate in the future’

A new United Nations-backed report, a UN press release says, “has revealed overwhelming consensus that renewable power will dominate in the future, with many experts saying that even large international corporations are increasingly choosing renewable energy products either from utilities or through direct investment in their own generating capacity.” Read the report here. Cleveland.com’s Kelly Reardon writes about it here.

Today: Trade your plastic bags for a reusable one

Today (Wednesday) from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.: Bring five plastic bags with you to Ohio State’s Ohio Union in Columbus and trade them for a reusable bag. The bags collected will be recycled. It’s part of the university’s Time for Change Week.

Intelligent transportation? See what’s ahead

Columbus’s technology-intense Smart Columbus project, which last year won the U.S. Department of Transportation’s national Smart City Challenge, is the focus of the next Environmental Professionals Network Breakfast Club program. It’s April 18 at Ohio State.

If only there were some sort of agency for that

CFAES environmental economist Tim Haab: “Markets, left alone, often fail to address environmental issues, and that is not good for the economy or society.”

Survey: Slashing EPA won’t help economy

Results from a survey of members of the Washington, D.C.-based Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, the leading professional organization of economists studying environmental and resource issues, found that most don’t think reducing the Environmental Protection Agency’s regulatory power will improve the U.S. economy. Read the story …

Peel in, peel out; or, this story has gotten traction

CFAES scientist Katrina Cornish’s research on using food waste — namely egg shells and tomato peels — in the making of tires has received media coverage from, among others, U.S. News & World Report, Waste Management World, Recycling Today, WOSU and EcoWatch.

To stave off, or not, another water crisis

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, which, among its work, keeps the air you breathe and water you drink clean, would see the biggest cut — 31 percent — of any federal agency in the White House’s proposed 2018 budget, according to a Reuters story. EPA’s Great Lakes Restoration Initiative would be especially hard hit. It faces a 97-percent cut in the proposed budget.

How would those cuts, if approved, hit home? Jeff Reutter, special adviser to Ohio State’s Ohio Sea Grant program, said in a recent issue of Cleveland Scene, “If we lose the EPA, we lose Lake Erie.”

The lake, among other things, provides drinking water for 3 million Ohioans.