Sustainability... In Business

Read all about it, hope you don’t see it

Severe Lake Erie algae forecastLots of good coverage of yesterday’s unfortunately bad Lake Erie summer harmful algal bloom forecast, including by the Cleveland Plain Dealer, Toledo Blade, Detroit News, CBC News and Wall Street Journal. NOAA, Ohio Sea Grant and their partners released the forecast yesterday at Ohio State’s Lake Erie campus, Stone Lab. (Photo: 2009 Lake Erie algal bloom aerial view, Tom Archer, Michigan Sea Grant.)

How to get a job after college

Come to CFAESWhy come to CFAES, whether for a sustainability-related major or otherwise? A recent survey shows again that CFAES grads get jobs. (Photo: University Communications.)

See what makes this GreenSpot green

Columbia Gas of Ohio HQ_2See two kinds of green at July 15’s Environmental Professionals Network breakfast program: The new LEED-certified Columbia Gas and NiSource Gas Distribution headquarters building in downtown Columbus, shown here, which is part of the city’s GreenSpot sustainability initiative; and, while looking down from that spot, the Columbus Clippers’ ballpark. Details and a link to sign up to be there. (Photo: Cleveland Construction, Inc.)

Le Foll: 3 wins through ‘climate-smart agriculture’

French Agriculture Minister Stéphane Le Foll, who talks about how agriculture can cut carbon emissions this Saturday at Ohio State, spoke at the Climate-Smart Agriculture Conference in March in France. The website French Food in the US gives a good rundown. Climate-smart agriculture, the conference’s website said, is based on three conditions: a “triple win” of food security, adaptation and mitigation. Know French? You can watch Le Foll’s conference talk here.

Le Foll: Adapt food production, don’t cut it, to help fight carbon

A 2014 EurActiv article called “France backs agroecology to fight climate change” quotes French Agriculture Minister Stéphane Le Foll:

“The agricultural sector has a responsibility to reduce its emissions, but it can also offer solutions for greenhouse gas reduction.

“This is about considering the ecological challenge of the fight against climate change, the challenge to food production and the challenges of agriculture and forestry as one entity.

“The answer to the big environmental questions is not to reduce agricultural production, but to adapt.”

He speaks on his country’s carbon sequestration work this Saturday at Ohio State.

French agriculture minister to speak June 27 at Ohio State

Stéphane_Le_Foll_(2014)CFAES’s Carbon Management and Sequestration Center hosts a free public talk by French Agriculture Minister Stéphane Le Foll, pictured, called “Research on Carbon Sequestration in Soils: A Priority for France,” at 11:30 a.m. this Saturday, June 27, in 333 Kottman Hall on Ohio State’s Columbus campus. CFAES Dean Bruce McPheron will give welcoming remarks. The event flier says, “The theme of ‘carbon sequestration’ is extremely pertinent to addressing climate change and is the focus of the forthcoming COP21 meeting to be held in Paris in December.” COP21 is the 2015 UN Climate Change Conference. (Photo: StagiaireMGIMO (own work) licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0 via Wikimedia Commons.)

How to protect Ohio’s water

Picture of clean drinking water 2Three leading Ohio State experts, including CFAES Dean Bruce McPheron, will talk about the battle for Lake Erie, and for all of Ohio’s water sources, at June 3’s Columbus Metropolitan Club Luncheon. It’s open to both club members and the public.

Benefits of recycling? There’s an app for that

recycling benefitsAn Ohio State student team has developed a new app called RecycleNow to help cities and other local governments quantify the social, economic and environmental benefits of recycling programs, according to a story by the Big Ten Network’s Matthew Wood. Neil Drobny, director of CFAES’s Environment, Economic, Development, and Sustainability major and coordinator of Ohio State’s Energy and Sustainability Cluster, helped the project get rolling. “The ultimate goal,” he said in the story, “(is) to get cities to recycle more.”

There will be rubber

CFAES’s Katrina Cornish writes in Ohio’s Country Journal about her research to develop a special dandelion species as a domestic rubber source: “Our results indicate that Ohio farmers should quite soon be able to grow this new crop on a large enough scale (several million acres) to make the United States self-sustainable for natural rubber production, and then expand to allow this country to become a rubber exporting country.” Weeds, ironically, are a challenge: “We need to kill the common dandelions without killing the rubber dandelions.” Read the story …

Register by Friday for Endangered Species Act workshop

ESA workshopRegister by this Friday, May 22, for a May 29 workshop on the Endangered Species Act. The workshop is for natural resource professionals who work with the act — and with endangered species like the Kirtland’s warbler shown here. CFAES scientist Jeremy Bruskotter, one of the event’s organizers, said the Endangered Species Act is more important than ever due to persistent threats like climate change and new issues such as white-nose disease in bats. Congress passed the act in 1973. Details and a link to online registration. (Photo: Joel Trick, USWFS.)