Sustainability... On Campus

Watch the trailer for ‘Green Fire’

Leading off this year’s Environmental Film Series at Ohio State is the Aldo Leopold documentary “Green Fire,” on Jan. 24. The Emmy Award-winning film, according to its website, “explores Leopold’s extraordinary career and his enduring influence — tracing how he shaped the modern conservation movement and continues to inspire projects all over the country that connect people and the land.” Watch the trailer above.

Film series runs on 6 straight Tuesday evenings

Movie clapboard and film reelHere’s the lineup for the Environmental Film Series:

• “Green Fire: Aldo Leopold and a Land Ethic for Our Time,” Jan. 24.

• “Before the Flood,” Jan. 31: Actor Leonardo DiCaprio’s climate change documentary.

• “Red Gold,” Feb. 7: Alaska’s Bristol Bay salmon fishery and the open-pit Pebble mine proposed in the bay’s headwaters.

• “A Race Against Time,” Feb. 14: Solar energy development in India and what’s impeding such development in the U.S.

• “Return of the River,” Feb. 21: The environmental and cultural benefits of the largest dam removal project in U.S. history.

• “Uprising,” Feb. 28: America’s dependence on coal plants; China’s impact on the global environment.

Environmental Film Series starts Jan. 24

Green Fire imageOhio State’s 2017 Environmental Film Series kicks off Jan. 24 with a look at legendary conservationist Aldo Leopold, author of the classic A Sand County Almanac.

Called “Green Fire: Aldo Leopold and a Land Ethic for Our Time,” the film starts at 7 p.m. in Room 130 in the university’s Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and Chemistry (CBEC) building, 151 W. Woodruff Ave. in Columbus.

Admission is free and open to the public. Free pizza and beverages will be served at 6:45 p.m. Advance registration isn’t needed.

Read more on the series here.

Public fruit parks coming to Columbus

Ohio State’s Wexner Center for the Arts, two Los Angeles-based artists, Columbus neighborhood groups and collaborators including CFAES’s outreach arm (OSU Extension) are partnering to design and plant two public “fruit parks” in Columbus’s Weinland Park and South Side areas.

“The fruit each location will yield is intended for the community to share and will be selected with an eye towards the history and preferences of each neighborhood,” said a Wexner Center press release.

Jan. 11 EPN event will feature climatologist Lonnie Thompson

JImage of Lonnie Thompsonan. 11’s Environmental Professionals Network breakfast program has a big title for a big topic — in fact, for four very closely related topics.

It’s called “Global Warming. You and Me. Energy Audits. Money in Your Pocket. Cleaner Air. More Comfortable Home. Help Is Available. Don’t Procrastinate.”

And it features talks by four Ohio experts — led by Lonnie Thompson, Distinguished University Professor in Ohio State’s School of Earth Sciences and senior research scientist with the Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center (pictured) — on a theme of climate and energy. Read more …

Watch: ‘Projects that matter in the real world’

So, CFAES students are doing great things, continue to do great things, in the field of sustainability. The video above shows the intelligence, passion and got-it-togetherness of some of them. Check it out.

Thursday at 4 p.m.: The unsustainability of ‘Breaking Bad’

Image of Allen MacDuffie 2Allen MacDuffie (pictured), associate professor in the University of Texas at Austin’s Department of English, will present “Energy, Ecology, and ‘Breaking Bad’s’ Unsustainability” at 4 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 1, at Ohio State in Columbus.

Admission is free and open to the public.

MacDuffie, who’s the author of Victorian Literature, Energy, and the Ecological Imagination, will discuss how narratives within the “Breaking Bad” TV series “register the cultural and environmental logic underlying our present moment of ecological crisis,” according to the event listing.

Ohio State’s Environmental Humanities program and Department of English are the event’s co-sponsors.

Details. (Photo: UT Austin.)

Blue wind, green power drive Buckeyes’ national ranking

Image of Ohio State marching band flagDetails on Ohio State’s partnership with the Blue Creek Wind Farm, which is Ohio’s biggest wind farm, are in a recent story by Scott Smith of the Big Ten Network. The Blue Creek operation, according to a quote in the story from Scott Potter of Ohio State’s Office of Energy and Environment, generates the equivalent of 20 percent of the Columbus campus’s power load, a number that led Ohio State to a No. 6 national ranking in the U.S. EPA’s Green Power Partnership program. (Certain, ahem, wolverine-based universities didn’t make the list.) (Photo: University Communications, Ohio State.)

Thursday at 4 p.m.: Future of Waterman Farm in Columbus?

Aerial image of Waterman FarmWhat’s a sustainable future for CFAES’s Waterman Agricultural and Natural Resources Laboratory (pictured) in Columbus? Faculty members from Ohio State’s Knowlton School of Architecture and CFAES’s School of Environment and Natural Resources will share their ideas in a seminar called “The New Waterman: At the Intersection of Productive Research, Education and Community Engagement.” It’s today, Thursday, Nov. 17, from 4-5:30 p.m. Free and open to the public. You can attend in Columbus, watch by videolink at OARDC in Wooster, or watch online on your computer or mobile device. More. (Photo: CFAES.)

Connect with people who share your passion: ‘Thousands of professionals in Ohio and beyond’

A reminder that, while you don’t have to be a member of the Environmental Professionals Network to attend its monthly programs, there are lots of good reasons to join anyway. (It’s free, too, so there’s that.) If you work in an environmental field, if you’re studying in an environmental field and hope to work in it eventually, maybe even soon, the network will link you to “thousands of professionals in Ohio and beyond,” its website says. “Professionals are thus connected in a ‘community’ of people who share their passion for our world and its environment, natural resources, people, and communities — local to global.” Visit the website here. Join here.