Sustainability... On The Farm

Top 5 moments from EPN’s events: ‘None pooped on stage, either’

Five years ago, David Hanselmann helped launch the Environmental Professionals Network, a statewide professional group based in CFAES’s School of Environment and Natural Resources.

Since then, EPN has grown to have nearly 2,000 members. It’s held 55 public monthly Breakfast Club programs, which typically draw more than 125 people, and five signature events, whose top attendance has been 1,400.

Hanselmann, who coordinates EPN as a lecturer in SENR, shares his top five moments from those events …

Farm bankruptcy rate has ticked up, may keep doing so

Declining farm income and farmland values will likely lead to an increase in the number of farmers who are delinquent on their loans and eventually a rise in farm bankruptcies, two CFAES agricultural economists predict …

Report: ‘Renewable power will dominate in the future’

A new United Nations-backed report, a UN press release says, “has revealed overwhelming consensus that renewable power will dominate in the future, with many experts saying that even large international corporations are increasingly choosing renewable energy products either from utilities or through direct investment in their own generating capacity.” Read the report here. Cleveland.com’s Kelly Reardon writes about it here.

Bee there for April 4 panel discussion

CFAES bee researcher Reed Johnson, pictured, will join a panel discussion on pollinators — their value to people and ecosystems, how pesticides are affecting them, and more — from 7-9 p.m. April 4 in University Hall on Ohio State’s Columbus campus. Free admission, and free food (Chipotle) while it lasts.

It’s one in a series of sustainability-related events planned for Ohio State’s Time for Change Week, April 3-9. (Photo: Ken Chamberlain, CFAES.)

Promising progress in algal bloom effort

Researchers involved in the Ohio Department of Higher Education’s Harmful Algal Bloom Research Initiative, including CFAES’s Margaret Kalcic, continue to get results in their quest to reduce and prevent harmful algal blooms in Ohio.

If only there were some sort of agency for that

CFAES environmental economist Tim Haab: “Markets, left alone, often fail to address environmental issues, and that is not good for the economy or society.”

Spring springing early in Ohio? No. And yes

Spring is arriving in Ohio this year at about the same time it did a year ago, CFAES scientist Dan Herms says. But still, it’s earlier than it was a couple decades ago. Read the story …

Workshop, and a Tanzanian farmer, make seedling health the foundation of IPM

On a normal day, Joseph Mbuji’s business is managing the production, harvest and delivery components of his diversified vegetable farm in Bagamoyo, Tanzania. But recently, he found himself delivering a lecture about his farm to an international audience at a Seedling Health Workshop at Sokoine University of Agriculture (SUA) in Morogoro in his country.

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To stave off, or not, another water crisis

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, which, among its work, keeps the air you breathe and water you drink clean, would see the biggest cut — 31 percent — of any federal agency in the White House’s proposed 2018 budget, according to a Reuters story. EPA’s Great Lakes Restoration Initiative would be especially hard hit. It faces a 97-percent cut in the proposed budget.

How would those cuts, if approved, hit home? Jeff Reutter, special adviser to Ohio State’s Ohio Sea Grant program, said in a recent issue of Cleveland Scene, “If we lose the EPA, we lose Lake Erie.”

The lake, among other things, provides drinking water for 3 million Ohioans.

Flower-wise, bees favor farm over city

Hungry honey bees appear to favor flowers in agricultural areas over those in neighboring urban areas, says a study done by scientists with CFAES.

The discovery, the scientists said, has implications for urban beekeepers and challenges assumptions that farmland and honey bees are incompatible.

Gather more details. (Photo: Honey bee on goldenrod, iStock.)