‘There are things we can do to be better and more effective teachers’

president drake videoHow to sustain great teaching? Ohio State President Michael V. Drake, M.D., who started June 1, speaks on teaching at a research university such as Ohio State, and on tapping into research on teaching to further improve that teaching, yesterday on his first visit to CFAES’s Wooster campus. Watch (1:50).

‘People really do want to know where their food is coming from’

dean mcpheron videoCFAES Dean Bruce McPheron talks about agriculture’s impact in Ohio and the growing interest and opportunities in local foods yesterday on CFAES’s Wooster campus, part of a visit by new Ohio State University President Michael V. Drake, M.D., and the university’s Roads Scholars tour. Watch (1:36).

On the road (to sustainability) (and more)

President Drake visitCFAES welcomed Ohio State’s new president, Michael V. Drake, M.D., center, and the university’s Roads Scholar tour today to its Wooster campus. The annual two-day tour is a chance for faculty and administrators to see Ohio State’s locations and impacts around the state. Scientists such as Casey Hoy of CFAES’s Agroecosystems Management Program, right, talked about their work. “Speed meetings” also featured sustainability-related CFAES efforts in biofuels, local food systems (local farmers shared what they’d grown), environmental quality, and biobased products and energy.

Expert: Lake Erie needs 40 percent phosphorus cut

image of Jeff ReutterJeff Reutter of Ohio Sea Grant and Stone Lab tells you everything you may want to know about Lake Erie’s harmful algal blooms, and what we can do to stop them, in a detailed Q-and-A with Ohio State’s faculty and staff newspaper. (Photo: onCampus.)

Report details chemicals at drilling site fire

Rick Reitzel of WCMH-TV, Columbus, interviewed Julie Weatherington-Rice, adjunct assistant professor in CFAES’s Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, for a story about last month’s fire, and the chemicals now being reported as being involved, at a hydraulic fracturing well site in southeast Ohio. Watch.

Watch: 3 timely tips for mowing your lawn

image of lawn mowing videoIt’s work keeping a lawn sustainable — green, healthy, nice to walk on and look at — especially in summer. Mowing it right is a key. CFAES turf expert Joe Rimelspach offers you three tips in a new YouTube video (3:08).

‘They’re highly adaptable and very destructive’

image of single feral swine in field 2Pigs gone wild — invasive, non-native feral swine like this one — have come to Ohio. Read the story. (Photo: iStock)

When you consider the other choices, ‘manure’ is actually pretty refreshing

image of green field and blue water 2Good manure storage improves the health not just of livestock and crops but of waterways, say organizers of a farmer panel discussion at the Aug. 14 Manure Science Review. The panelists, all northeast Ohio dairy producers, will share their plans and practices for storing manure. (Hat tip to George Costanza.) (Photo: iStock.)

‘The new green is black’

The Cleveland Plain Dealer’s John Funk reports on quasar energy group’s biogas power plants and the partnership role of CFAES’s research arm, OARDC:

The new green is black for Quasar Energy Group, a company that with federal and state assistance has developed the technology to generate electricity from every flush of your toilet and every scrap of food waste and grease sent down a drain.

Quasar’s success story starts with European technology, steadily improved by researchers at the Ohio State University’s Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center in Wooster and refined almost daily by Quasar and OARDC engineers.

Check it out.

Side benefits: Well-fed food crops, cleaner water

subsurface band applicator 2 for GBAnother look at the prototype poultry litter applicator, called a subsurface band applicator, set to be shown at Manure Science Review. Instead of spreading poultry litter, a beneficial crop fertilizer, on the surface of a farm field, it buries the material a few inches deep. The practice slashes phosphorus, nitrogen and bacterial runoff into water. The new design also can be used to side-dress organic corn, for example, as shown here. Event details here and here. (Photo: Tom Way, USDA-ARS.)