Chancellor John Carey, CFAES Dean Bruce McPheron, others to speak on Ohio’s water quality efforts Friday

Ohio Department of Higher Education Chancellor John Carey, CFAES Dean Bruce McPheron, and colleagues from the University of Toledo and Central State University will hold a public meeting tomorrow to talk about progress in and plans for improving Ohio’s water quality. Read More »

So I thought we were getting away from this

Cell phone useWould you want Wi-Fi in the wilderness? If so, why? Fresh from an ascent of Mount Kilimanjaro, Jay Zagorsky, a scientist with Ohio State though not with CFAES, writes about “Why Google’s Plan to Blanket Wilderness With Wi-Fi Is a Bad Idea.” It’s in yesterday’s Huffington Post Tech blog. Your thoughts?

Biofuel sources hit the road. Then what happens?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERACFAES scientist Ajay Shah answered the question, “What is the additional cost of road maintenance due to cellulosic feedstock delivery to a biorefinery?” recently in Ohio’s Country Journal. Biorefineries produce biofuels from cellulosic feedstocks like corn stover, shown here. (Photo by Wally Wilhelm, USDA-ARS).

3:30 talk today: What’s going on in the beekeeping world?

Kim Flottum 2Kim Flottum, editor of Bee Culture magazine, published by Medina’s A.I. Root Co., speaks today at CFAES’s research arm, OARDC. He’ll talk on “What’s Going on in the Beekeeping World” from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. in 121 Fisher Auditorium, 1680 Madison Ave., Wooster. There’s also a video link to 244 Kottman Hall, 2021 Coffey Road, on Ohio State’s campus in Columbus. Free. Everyone’s welcome. Read a Mother Earth News interview with him here. (Photo: Bee Culture.)

1 day, 9 ways to manage what lives on your land even better

Conference on woods and wildlife 2A Nov. 14 workshop near Toledo aims to help landowners better understand and manage their natural resources, from trees to bees to ponds to wildlife. Read More »

‘Dry Season’ tonight in Environmental Film Series

YEARS OF LIVING DANGEROUSLYOhio State’s Environmental Film Series continues tonight with “Dry Season” from the Showtime series “Years of Living Dangerously.” Among the episode’s onscreen correspondents are actors Don Cheadle and Harrison Ford. In person, Greg Hitzhusen of CFAES’s School of Environment and Natural Resources and Bryan Mark of Ohio State’s Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center will lead the discussion afterward. (A previous post listed them wrongly as last week’s facilitators.) Free admission. Everyone’s welcome. Details here and here. (Photo: Showtime.)

Get tickets now, or at least soon, for February evening with M. Sanjayan

M Sanjayan and Earth A New WildThe Environmental Professionals Network, a service of CFAES’s School of Environment and Natural Resources, is presenting a special evening with M. Sanjayan, host of the PBS series “Earth: A New Wild,” on Feb. 11 in Columbus. That’s about four months away still. But tickets are going fast. Read More »

Ohio State Soil Judging Team going to nationals

Soil judging team 2The Ohio State Soil Judging Team is heading to the National Collegiate Soil Judging Contest next April that will be hosted by Kansas State University in Manhattan, Kansas.

This past Friday, Oct. 16, the Soil Judging Team took home third-place school honors with a strong showing in the Northeast Regional Soil Competition hosted by Brian Slater and Ohio State at Louis Bromfield’s Malabar Farm in Lucas, Ohio. Read More »

Just watch where you put your hands

Does whatever a spider canColumbus’s “Main Street bridge is crawling with spiders” — especially, it seems, its handrails. And in terms of the growing health of a restored section of the Scioto River, that’s good. CFAES’s Dave Shetlar is quoted. Mark Somerson of the Columbus Dispatch has the story. (Photo: Nathan Lovegrove, iStock.)

Oct. 27 workshop: Statewide impacts of shale development

An energy infrastructure workshop called Statewide Impacts of Shale and Alternative Energy Development, hosted by CFAES’s outreach arm, OSU Extension, is Tuesday, Oct. 27, on Ohio State’s Columbus campus. You’re invited to attend. Shale oil and gas development and its effects on landowners, communities and public officials (through land leasing, influxes of workers, building new pipelines and more) will be a main focus. Read more here and here. Register here (the cost is $30 and includes lunch).