Posts Tagged ‘Harmful Algal Blooms’

Just announced: Call for HABRI pre-proposals

Ohio Sea Grant is requesting pre-proposals for one- to two-year research projects from Ohio colleges and universities as part of the Ohio Department of Higher Education’s Harmful Algal Bloom Research Initiative.

Lake Erie algal bloom research at risk

A June 14 Great Lakes Today story by Elizabeth Miller said the proposed 2018 federal budget would “cut all federal funding for Sea Grant programs, including Ohio’s.” At risk, among other things, would be crucial health-related research on harmful algal blooms.

Miller, for example, interviewed two Ohio Sea Grant-funded researchers, Stuart Ludsin and CFAES’s Jiyoung Lee, who are trying to determine if toxins produced by harmful algal blooms can get into food — specifically, into fresh vegetables irrigated with bloom-tainted waters and fish such as walleye that swam in such waters.

All hands needed on deck for Lake Erie: Ohio Sea Grant and its many partners

When the weather is good, charter boat captain Dave Spangler takes his boat out on Lake Erie almost every day. Using that time to help Ohio State’s Ohio Sea Grant program solve the problem of harmful algal blooms is an obvious choice for the small business owner, whose love for the lake is evident as he speaks passionately about being on the water and helping his clients catch fish …

Let’s see what’s out there

NOAA has issued its first early season Lake Erie algal bloom bulletin. You can get weekly and, starting in July, twice-weekly updates on the Forecasting webpage of NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science. You also can sign up to get them by email. (Photo: Lake Erie on May 8, showing sediment plumes from the Maumee River and other tributaries, NOAA CoastWatch.)

Hack your lake

A May 2 story by Cleveland.com’s Peter Krouse featured the Erie Hack Water Innovation Summit in ClevelandJeff Reutter, special adviser to and former director of Ohio State’s Lake Erie-serving Ohio Sea Grant and Stone Lab programs, was interviewed for the story.

The Erie Hack competition, according to its website, “unites coders, developers, engineers, and water experts to generate enduring solutions to Lake Erie’s biggest challenges.”

Water work

Here are five ways CFAES is working to stop harmful algal blooms and improve water quality (scroll down) …

Reduce Lake Erie’s phosphorus load by 40 percent? Yes, we can. This could be a big part of it

Injecting farm fertilizer below the ground instead of spreading it on the surface could help achieve most of Lake Erie’s 40 percent phosphorus reduction goal, said CFAES scientist Margaret Kalcic in a Dec. 3 story in the Toledo Blade. The practice also would allow farmers to maintain their productivity, she said.

The reduction goal is aimed at preventing the harmful algal blooms plaguing the lake. Agricultural phosphorus runoff is considered the blooms’ main cause.

Kalcic joined the Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering this summer as an assistant professor. Her research area is watershed hydrology, especially water quality in agricultural regions.

‘Tide turning’ in bloom battle?

Image of Lake Erie algal bloomA recent Columbus Dispatch article said there’s reason to be optimistic in the battle against Lake Erie’s algal blooms. Robyn Wilson, who studies risk analysis and decision science as an associate professor in CFAES’s School of Environment and Natural Resources, was one of the experts quoted. “I don’t think we need regulation,” she said in the article. “I think farmers have gotten a bad rap. They are highly motivated to fix the problem under their own terms.” Read the article. (Photo: Lake Erie algal bloom by Tom Archer, Michigan Sea Grant.)

Meet me on the waters of the Ohio

Kara Lofton of Pittsburgh-area public radio program The Allegheny Front reports that “It’s Not Just Lake Erie. The Ohio River Has a Major Algae Problem, Too.”

Science could help identify and track where Lake Erie’s phosphorus comes from

Satellite image of Lake Erie algal bloomOhio State scientists are developing ways to identify the many kinds of phosphorus getting into Lake Erie. To do it, they’re determining the compounds’ chemical signatures. The goal is to be able to link the compounds back to their sources — whether farm field, livestock facility, wastewater treatment plant or otherwise — and so better target efforts aimed at keeping phosphorus out of Lake Erie. Excess phosphorus is one of the causes of the harmful algal blooms plaguing Lake Erie and other lakes. CFAES’s Field to Faucet initiative is a co-funder of the research. Read Ohio Sea Grant’s press release on the work. (Photo: Western Lake Erie algal bloom, NOAA.)