Posts Tagged ‘Lake Erie’

All hands needed on deck for Lake Erie: Ohio Sea Grant and its many partners

When the weather is good, charter boat captain Dave Spangler takes his boat out on Lake Erie almost every day. Using that time to help Ohio State’s Ohio Sea Grant program solve the problem of harmful algal blooms is an obvious choice for the small business owner, whose love for the lake is evident as he speaks passionately about being on the water and helping his clients catch fish …

Stone Lab awards undergrad research scholarships; or, water them, watch them grow

Eight outstanding undergraduate students — four from Ohio State, including three from CFAES, and four from other Midwestern colleges — have been chosen for Stone Lab’s 2017 Research Experience for Undergraduates Scholarship Program.

Stone Lab is Ohio State’s island campus on Lake Erie. It holds classes and conducts research in a range of fields related to water science. (Photo: Summer 2015 Stone Lab evolution class by Madelyn Strahan [CC BY-NC 2.0], via Ohio Sea Grant.)

Let’s see what’s out there

NOAA has issued its first early season Lake Erie algal bloom bulletin. You can get weekly and, starting in July, twice-weekly updates on the Forecasting webpage of NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science. You also can sign up to get them by email. (Photo: Lake Erie on May 8, showing sediment plumes from the Maumee River and other tributaries, NOAA CoastWatch.)

‘It would be amazing to give people clean drinking water’

CFAES student Ashlee Balcerzak, who’s from Maumee near Toledo, was a pre-med major at first. Then she took a class at Ohio State’s Stone Lab on Lake Erie and everything changed.

“I got really interested in the actual overall water quality issues and the ecosystems,” she says, “so I ended up changing my major to environmental science.” Her specialty: water science.

Now, as an undergraduate researcher in the college, she’s studying the use of magnetic bacteria to remove algal bloom-causing phosphorus from waters such as Lake Erie. She’s even given a TEDx Toledo talk on it.

“I’m just so passionate about water science,” she says. “I want to help others.”

Hack your lake

A May 2 story by Cleveland.com’s Peter Krouse featured the Erie Hack Water Innovation Summit in ClevelandJeff Reutter, special adviser to and former director of Ohio State’s Lake Erie-serving Ohio Sea Grant and Stone Lab programs, was interviewed for the story.

The Erie Hack competition, according to its website, “unites coders, developers, engineers, and water experts to generate enduring solutions to Lake Erie’s biggest challenges.”

Watch: ‘On Wednesday, we’re going to Kelleys Island to look for salamanders, and that should be a lot of fun’

“Every day, we’re out in the field, we’re collecting data, we’re studying animals,” says 2015 Stone Lab summer student Jeffry Hayes in the video above. The lab, which is at Put-in-Bay in western Lake Erie, is a “great place to do all that,” he says. “There have been a lot of experiences here that I can put on a resume.” Are you a student in college or high school? An educator? Registration is open now for Stone Lab’s summer courses …

Water work

Here are five ways CFAES is working to stop harmful algal blooms and improve water quality (scroll down) …

New (permanent) captain of the ship

Image of Chris WinslowChris Winslow, pictured, who’s been serving as interim director of Ohio Sea Grant and Ohio State’s Stone Lab since April 2015, has been named permanent director of the programs effective Feb. 1. (Photo: Ohio Sea Grant.)

‘An excellent location to do research’

Image of Stone Lab boatOhio State’s Stone Lab on Lake Erie is inviting college undergrads to apply for its 2017 Research Experience for Undergraduates Scholarship Program.

Reduce Lake Erie’s phosphorus load by 40 percent? Yes, we can. This could be a big part of it

Injecting farm fertilizer below the ground instead of spreading it on the surface could help achieve most of Lake Erie’s 40 percent phosphorus reduction goal, said CFAES scientist Margaret Kalcic in a Dec. 3 story in the Toledo Blade. The practice also would allow farmers to maintain their productivity, she said.

The reduction goal is aimed at preventing the harmful algal blooms plaguing the lake. Agricultural phosphorus runoff is considered the blooms’ main cause.

Kalcic joined the Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering this summer as an assistant professor. Her research area is watershed hydrology, especially water quality in agricultural regions.